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January 2012 Archives

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Texas grand jury: murder-for-hire story made up for child custody

Readers in the El Paso area know that when parents divorce, children are thrust into a situation not of their making. And parents generally realize this, and try to protect their children in the best way they can. Sometimes, however, a dispute can arise that pits parents against each other so strongly that the disagreements could threaten child custody proceedings for one or even both of the adults.

Ensuring an equitable division of assets in Texas divorces

Before a Texas couple decides to divorce, oftentimes one of the spouses handles most if not all of the financial matters of the household. A married couple may share a bank account, but sometimes one person ends up paying the bills and balancing the checkbook, while the other person doesn't even see his or her paycheck because it's electronically deposited. Groceries and other household items are purchased, but the individual purchaser may not ever see the calculated effects on the couple's joint bank account; the other spouse handles all of that.

Child support: Texas Attorney General urges parents to pay

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott recently urged parents to make a 2012 resolution to pay all of their child support this year in a timely manner. In an open letter, the attorney general reminded readers of the importance and specific uses of payments made for child support. Abbott pointed out the common knowledge that child support payments are needed to provide children with food, shelter and clothing. But the letter also notes that full and timely payments do much more than provide what we normally think of as basic needs.

New book offers tips on how to co-parent after a divorce

Texans who are dealing with a divorce may be interested in a new book, humorously titled, "You Can Keep the Damn China! And 824 Other Great Tips on Dealing with Divorce." The book consists of brief and insightful comments from people from a range of backgrounds and who have previously gone through a divorce. Essentially, the book amasses a collection of potentially helpful advice that spans the emotional spectrum of post-divorce living.