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Texas fathers' rights: Man battles in court for his daughter

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Texas fathers may sometimes feel as if they are being unfairly treated in court when it comes to child custody. One man has been fighting for years to improve fathers' rights after he lost custody of his young daughter due to an outdated state law. The man is now waiting for a decision in his case.

His saga began in 2006 after he began dating the little girl's mother. She claimed to be divorced and when she became pregnant, the two moved in together. When the baby was born, he began to suspect something wasn't right with their situation. The hospital denied him the right to sign the girl's birth certificate and he soon found out that his girlfriend was still married.

While they stayed together for a couple of years after that, they split and his girlfriend reconciled with her husband. Unfortunately, the husband went to court and stated he plans to raise the little girl as his own and he was the only father that she had known. A court battle soon began and the father plans to continue fighting until he gets his little girl back. His case has already spurred huge changes in Michigan's law and for fathers' rights. With the most recent court appearance, he hopes that he is one step closer to regaining custody of his little girl.

In June, the governor of the involved state signed a new law that would offer biological fathers the right to petition the courts for parental rights. Critics of the old law believe it was more focused on keeping families together than interested in the child's actual welfare. The husband of the girl's mother in this case is actually serving prison time for a drug offense. Such a case can be heartbreaking, but this man has stood up for fathers' rights in his state with much success. His story could potentially influence other states, including Texas, to take a closer look at custody laws to make sure another case like this doesn't happen again.

Source: wnem.com, "Twisted parental rights case tests new state laws," Erik Horn, Oct. 19, 2012

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