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Military divorce at an all-time low in Texas and elsewhere

Thursday, June 29, 2017

According to a recent study, the rate of military divorce in the Navy and other parts of the Armed Forces is steadily dropping. The frequency with which servicemen and women divorce one another has dropped significantly, based on the independent study. The study, conducted by the Rand Corporation, is seeking to understand the factors that influence military divorce in states across the country, including Texas.

The overall rate of military divorce has gone down from 3.5 percent to 3.4 this year, with much of those numbers being accounted for by female soldiers, 7.2 percent of whom informed the Department of Defense of a finalized divorce and official status change. This number is down from 8 percent the previous year, a significant reduction. It is important for soldiers to notify their superiors of such a status change sooner rather than later in order to ensure military benefits are disseminated properly.

The study made special note of the fact that military families formed after 2001 seem more likely to endure, possibly because soldiers and their families had a more realistic understanding of the realities of war after the invasion of Afghanistan and Iraq. While regular servicemen and women sport higher divorce rates than officers, at a 3.8 percent versus 1.9 percent ratio, it has also been noted that the effect of deployment is felt more keenly in families in which the woman is the deployed soldier. The Rand Corporation has not as yet made any specific statements to explain this piece of data.

Military divorce can, in many ways, be an even more unique challenge than its civilian counterpart. If one or both spouses are soldiers, it can place more pressure on a marriage, as many Texas residents are keenly aware. In the event of a military divorce, it is important for both parties to fully understand their rights and responsibilities under state, federal and military law.

Source: navytimes.com, Military divorce rate ticks downward, Andrew Tilghman, Dec. 19, 2013

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